“Now I Feel Free on My Land”

“Now I Feel Free on My Land”

In an isolated part of #CostaRica, near the border with Panama, the 300 members of the BriBri tribe live. Not long ago, one of their members had the #aspirational goal of bringing #tourism to their area. It's not easy to get to, up the river in a boat carved from a single tree, but the trip is worth it. It's incredible to see the how outside visitors have, and will continue to, effect these wonderful people.


The Yorkin Indigenous Reserve, Costa Rica

We’re battling against the current as we head up the river. In a long wooden dugout, carved out of a single tree, two members of the indigenous Bribri tribe are taking me to one of their small communities at the very edge of Costa Rica, alongside the border with Panama. 

It takes us about an hour to navigate our way along the waterway, pushing off rocks and avoiding the strongest parts of the fast-flowing river. 

Boat ride to a Bribri tribe community
Boat ride to a Bribri tribe community

But the efforts to reach the settlement are nothing compared to the struggles these Aboriginal people have had to keep their land and their heritage.

One of our guides keeping watch as we ride

Like many indigenous races across the world, the Bribri people have become disenfranchised because of the spread of colonialism. Spanish and other Western immigrants treated them like primitive natives and they were denied the same rights as other residents of Costa Rica. That created a spiral of poverty and despair.

We can feel freedom on these fields

“20 years ago the community was moving to different areas because in this area they have no jobs, no nothing,” local indigenous man, Cesar Selles, tells me.

“So most of the people move away from the Aboriginal reserve and they work in the cities. We don’t like cities, the noise of the cities is completely different and we can feel freedom on these fields that is not the same freedom I felt when I lived in San Jose.”

from  $88

Day Trip to The Yorkin Indigenous Reserve

Aspirational
 Yorkin School, A066, Tirrases, San Jose, Costa Rica
You may also like

Damas Mangrove Boat Tour

Blue Water Adventure - Turtle Tour

He, along with his mother, started a project to bring in new funds to the Bribri people and stop the exodus of young men looking for work and a future. And it has worked.

“Now I feel free on my land,” he says.

The land of the Bribri people

A BriBri Community

Cesar is 30 years old and was just 11 when his mother came up with the idea to allow tourists to visit their community, here in the Yorkin Indigenous Reserve. They started it together and over the years it has developed and grown. With the project, they allow in a small number of visitors each day to experience life in the community. Forty families take it in turns to host the tourists, cook them meals and talk about their culture.

There are only 300 people in the whole community but the area feels much larger

There are only 300 people in the whole community but the area feels much larger. As Cesar walks me through, he points at wooden huts of varying sizes. Each of these is a family home. They’re not all clumped together, though. The tribe likes to live close to each other but not right next to each other. It could easily be a 20 minute walk between some houses.

Cesar in front of a Bribri home

The riverfront buildings at the entrance to the community include a primary school, made up of several small huts perched on the edge of a hill. But further in, through sweaty jungle, across slippery mud, past lush green fruit trees, is the secondary school. It’s here that Cesar remembers how the community used to be. 

He tells me a story about how each child was given a pen at the start of the year and they had to treat it like gold because there were no spares. 

how each child was given a pen at the start of the year and they had to treat it like gold because there were no spares

All the children were so careful not to write too hard or to drop it anywhere.

A home nestled back in the forest

Sitting on a balcony in the building the community has dedicated to hosting visitors, I ask Cesar what it’s like to grow up as child here.

“When I was very young, I would go to the river and swim with my friends – and girlfriends too – and run through the fields hunting and eating fruits,” he says.

“When I got a day off I would play football… but the life of the Aboriginals is more related to the parents. So most of the time I had to be ready about 3 in the morning when my father would leave for the fields. So I would walk with my father to the fields and work, normally cutting bananas or this kind of thing. After that we would come back and sometimes I had free time or sometimes I was completely exhausted with no time for play but there was always time to go to the river for fishing or this kind of thing.”

there was always time to go to the river for fishing 
         
A BriBri marksman takes aim

Tourism and Agriculture

Agriculture has been the lifeblood of the indigenous communities for generations. The waterways flow through the natural reserves of this part of the country, one river even forming the border with Panama – and they create a fertile garden for the local produce to grow. Bananas and cacao beans are the two main products which the locals harvest and then sell to large companies.

They don’t make a lot of money from it. The cacao beans, which are used to make some of the world’s finest chocolates, sell for 90 cents a kilogram if they’re freshly-picked. This is why the added income from tourism is a considerable supplement.

          
Daily life

But it’s not about making a fortune. All the profit the community makes from tourism is invested into health treatments, infrastructure and the local school.

“The main pillars of the organisation is to protect the traditions, to go on according with mother nature, and keep the people working together,” Cesar explains.

“We are not thinking about money. The most important thing is that the organisation works for the community and makes the community self-sufficient but with the idea that we know we can’t be alone so we can keep some different things from outside. But the three main things we want to keep are our traditions, our culture and the health of the community.”

The three main things we want to keep are our traditions, our culture and the health of the community
Isolation helps the BriBri maintain their heritage 

It can sometimes be hard to think about traditional cultures in the context of a modern globalised world. When you look at other countries, it seems the traits we share are starting to overtake the ones we once thought unique. But the physical isolation of the Bribri people makes it easier for them to maintain their heritage – if they want to.

“We’re looking for those traditions forgotten of the past,” Cesar says, “like the dance.”

We’re looking for those traditions forgotten of the past, like the dance

“They have a different kind of dance people are not doing today because for several years we were weak and those traditions were lost. So now we are looking backwards and looking for those traditions to recover.”

“Also the food… and one of the main things we want to keep is the language. For many years the teachers who came to give lessons at the school came from other areas so they didn’t speak Bribri. So we got forbidden to speak Bribri at the schools and we had to speak Spanish. So for that reason many of the teenagers of the community, they don’t speak well Bribri.”

Bribri food

The Indigenous Food

Most of my conversation with Cesar has been over lunch, which has been prepared for us by one of the community’s families. It’s their turn in the rotation and while the husband and wife work in the kitchen, their teenage children pop in and out. The Bribri are a matriarchal society, so it’s the woman who takes the lead today. Only she is able to perform the ceremony to turn the dried cacao beans into a smooth and rich chocolate drink, for instance.

Making a rich chocolate drink - YUM! 

The meal is delicious. Absolutely delicious. But it’s not what you would expect to eat anywhere else. There are Costa Rican lentils, fried ferns, boiled palm and tropical pumpkin. Maybe some people would feel (unjustifiably) embarrassed serving such an odd assortment of local plants for lunch to a foreign visitor. But not here. It’s the local culture… and that’s the whole point.

The meal is delicious. Absolutely delicious. But it’s not what you would expect to eat anywhere else
Traditional Bribri meal
Lentils, fried ferns, boiled palm and tropical pumpkin

“The most important thing is that I want the world to see us how we are – Aboriginals,” Cesar stresses.

The most important thing is that I want the world to see us how we are – Aboriginals
Cesar and his family

“We have to feel proud again that we are Aboriginals. For several years, the teenagers go to the cities and they don’t want to say that they are Aboriginal, they don’t want to say that they are Bribri. But things are changing and we are proud to say I’m Bribri. We want the world to rediscover us as the original Bribri with the language, with our traditions, and with our food.”

Time Travel Turtle was a guest of Visit Costa Rica but the opinions, over-written descriptions and bad jokes are his own.

Loved this story?

Subscribe to our newsletter

to receive new story and activity ideas in your inbox.

Keep inspired By other stories